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How IFC Recruitment Rules Help Your Fraternity Rush

    

Rules get a bad rap.

We see them as being restrictive; a limit to what we can do and achieve. But like it or not, rules create order, negate chaos, and allow structure.

For a good example, look no further than your favorite sports. Imagine a football game where a wide receiver could run out of bounds to score a touchdown. Or a soccer game where the striker could throw the ball with his hands.

In short, we need rules.

And if you’re a recruitment chair on your fraternity chapter’s executive board, you’ve probably questioned what the point was of so many IFC recruitment rules during rush.

But have you ever considered how those same rules might actually be helping you?

Well, here’s your answer…

Here’s How IFC Recruitment Rules Help Your Fraternity Rush.

Rules Keep You Out of Trouble

Trouble and fraternities seem to go together like peanut butter and cough syrup.

That is to say not well at all—and in fact, should never, ever, be mixed.

A standard rule within ALL Rush Week guidelines is the stipulation that any fraternity participating in Rush Week must host all events dry. That means, no alcohol. And though, the appeal of throwing a party with a few drinks to impress potential recruits is enticing, here’s one thing to remember:

Most of your recruits are going to be minors

Most of your recruits are going to be MINORS.

Do you get it now?

The no-alcohol policy is in place to help brothers that are above the age of 21 stay out of legal trouble for “accidentally” providing alcohol to minors. Let alone the liability that comes from brothers-of-age that are drinking in that kind of mixed environment. Imagine an 18-year-old independent gentleman sneaking a bottle away from your fraternity house, sharing it with a few friends, driving that night and crashing his car into a crowd of people.

The first question that will come up is, “Where did you get the alcohol?”

All roads lead back to your fraternity house, and now you’re on the hook for damages—or worse, wrongful death.

Lastly, consider the quality of brothers you’d be attracting with an offer of free drinks. Are the kinds of upstanding, brotherly, and studious young men your fraternity needs going to be the type to get wasted at the frat house?

Probably not.

Rules Keep You Accountable

Another universal principle of fraternity rush week is two-fold:

  • You must throw at least two events

  • No female recruiters

Let’s start with the two-event minimum.

In terms of accountability, this rule was created to make sure there’s a clear standard for chapters participating in Rush Week. It’d be silly if potential recruits were looking to engage with the school’s IFC chapters and some of them threw one event and others through ten.

It’d bring into question the sense of organization for the council at large, and make a young aspirant question if it’s worth joining such a disorganized system.

And that would hurt recruitment for everyone.

Hence, the creation of the two-event minimum; a new standard for universal participation.

Lastly, no female recruiters.

This one should go without saying, but leveraging a young group of women—sorority or otherwise—to join your fraternity is a bad idea. There are few things better at influencing the minds of young men than a beautiful woman. And many fraternity chapters know this. The problem is similar to the issue with alcohol--do you really want new recruits to have joined your chapter because they thought it’d help them get girls?

Those aren’t quality brothers, and your fraternity isn’t Hooters.

You don’t need sex to sell it, just yourselves and your achievements.

Rules Keep You Organized

Organizational rules are usually logistical in nature.

Within fraternity rush week, the biggest are these:

  • All events must be approved by the IFC

  • You have to meet with the other recruitment chairs

In the case of the former, this rule is in place to ensure transparency across the board for all Rush programming. For the IFC as a whole and for your larger national chapters, having an undergraduate chapter host rogue events that may be questionable in nature (i.e. drinking or girls) is an accident waiting to happen.

Rather, the IFC board of your school must know what events are being put on, to ensure the integrity and quality of the Rush process as a whole.

Regarding the latter, this rule is in place to make sure there’s consensus and cooperation between all participating fraternities. If you’re your chapter’s recruitment chair, you need to be on the same page as your counterparts. This kind of open dialogue will foster better bonds between your fraternities and help you coordinate an acceptable outcome for all parties.

Remember, new recruits are going to choose the fraternity that is the best fit for their personality and ambitions. It’s not a numbers game, so work together to make the process for each potential applicant’s finding their home as smooth as possible.

If you’d like to learn more about OmegaFi and what we can do for your chapter recruiting
Call 1.800.276.6342 or Contact us directly here.

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